Leptospermum

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Leptospermum

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What do Leptospermum look like?

Tea Trees are from a hardy and adaptable genus that grows in many sizes from shrubs to trees, reaching 1–8m tall, rarely up to 20m, with dense branching. The leaves are evergreen, alternate, simple, sharp-tipped, and small, in most species not over 1cm long. The flowers are up to 3cm diameter. White is the predominant flower colour, but there are a few species which produce pink or red flowers

The characteristic five petalled flowers have a dainty appearance and are produced in profusion. They attract many bees and butterflies.

Where is Leptospermum found?

There are over 80 species, and most are endemic to Australia, with the greatest diversity in the south of the continent. 

Tea Trees range extends from sub-alpine areas to wet coastal forests, temperate woodlands and the arid inland. In fact, the only major environment where Tea Treesare absent is probably rainforest.

Fast facts:

  1. Leptospermum is also known as tea tree. 
  2. Leptospermum have characteristic five petalled flowers with a dainty appearance and are produced in profusion. They attract many bees and butterflies.

Leptospermum (Tea Tree)

Tea Trees range extends from sub-alpine areas to wet coastal forests, temperate woodlands and the arid inland. In fact, the only major environment where Tea Treesare absent is probably rainforest.

There are over 80 species, and most are endemic to Australia, with the greatest diversity in the south of the continent.

Tea Trees are from a hardy and adaptable genus that grows in many sizes from shrubs to trees, reaching 1–8m tall, rarely up to 20m, with dense branching. The leaves are evergreen, alternate, simple, sharp-tipped, and small, in most species not over 1cm long. The flowers are up to 3cm diameter. White is the predominant flower colour, but there are a few species which produce pink or red flowers

The characteristic five petalled flowers have a dainty appearance and are produced in profusion. They attract many bees and butterflies. 

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