Leucopogon

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Leucopogon

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What do Leucopogon look like?

Leucopogon is a genus of about 150-160 species of shrubby flowering plants. Leucopogons are erect densely branched shrub, seldom more that 1m high, with narrow pungent-pointed leaves 3.7–8mm long. The white flowers are pendent-like, tubular, 4–5mm long, hairy inside tube and are borne singly but abundantly along ends of branches. The fruit is a ridged and hairless rounded drupe.

Where are Leucopogon found?

They are native to Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia, the western Pacific Islands and Malaysia, with the greatest species diversity in south-eastern Australia.

Fast facts:

  1. The common name for Leucopogon is beard-heath or beard heath.
  2.  Leucopogon is derived from ancient Greek. Translated as White Beard.

Leucopogon

Leucopogon is a genus of about 150-160 species of shrubby flowering plants. Leucopogons are erect densely branched shrub, seldom more that 1m high, with narrow pungent-pointed leaves 3.7–8mm long. The white flowers are pendent-like, tubular, 4–5mm long, hairy inside tube and are borne singly but abundantly along ends of branches. The fruit is a ridged and hairless rounded drupe. 

They are native to Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia, the western Pacific Islands and Malaysia, with the greatest species diversity in south-eastern Australia. The common name is beard-heath or beard heath. Leucopogon is derived from ancient Greek. Translated as White Beard.

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